A Workshop on
 

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speakers [2018/09/18 23:33]
mohammed
speakers [2018/09/20 09:26] (current)
mohammed
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 <WRAP centeralign left 80px>{{:kirby_witte.jpg?80|}}\\ </WRAP> <fc #7A97BB>**Dr. Kirby Ann Witte**</fc>\\ <wrap  <WRAP centeralign left 80px>{{:kirby_witte.jpg?80|}}\\ </WRAP> <fc #7A97BB>**Dr. Kirby Ann Witte**</fc>\\ <wrap 
-lo>Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University </wrap>\\+lo> Carnegie Mellon University </wrap>\\
 //"Title: Progress in human-in-the-loop optimization of exoskeleton assistance"//\\ //"Title: Progress in human-in-the-loop optimization of exoskeleton assistance"//\\
 <wrap lo>**Abstract:** Exoskeletons promise to improve the lives of people with disabilities either by acting as rehabilitative tools or by improving performance in daily activities. Progress in exoskeleton development has been rapid in the last several years, but it is still difficult to determine how device hardware and control settings should be adjusted to fit individual needs. In this talk we will discuss an approach to address this problem which utilizes a highly flexible exoskeleton emulator system and human-in-the-loop optimization. We will cover guiding principles of design for exoskeleton emulators, human in the loop optimization, and the results of three separate experiments using these tools to optimize several different high level controllers for both walking and running.  We expect tools and methods such as those explored in these experiments to improve the use, design, and prescription of assistive devices from exoskeletons to orthoses and prostheses. <wrap lo>**Abstract:** Exoskeletons promise to improve the lives of people with disabilities either by acting as rehabilitative tools or by improving performance in daily activities. Progress in exoskeleton development has been rapid in the last several years, but it is still difficult to determine how device hardware and control settings should be adjusted to fit individual needs. In this talk we will discuss an approach to address this problem which utilizes a highly flexible exoskeleton emulator system and human-in-the-loop optimization. We will cover guiding principles of design for exoskeleton emulators, human in the loop optimization, and the results of three separate experiments using these tools to optimize several different high level controllers for both walking and running.  We expect tools and methods such as those explored in these experiments to improve the use, design, and prescription of assistive devices from exoskeletons to orthoses and prostheses.